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About Benchmarking Public Procurement 2017

Launched in 2013, Benchmarking Public Procurement  focuses on legal and regulatory environments that affect the ability of private sector companies to do business with governments. It aims to promote evidence-based decision making by governments and to build evidence in areas where few empirical data have been presented so far.

The Benchmarking Public Procurement 2017 report presents comparable data on public procurement laws and regulations across 180 economies to meet the various needs of different stakeholders for information, analysis, and policy action. It provides private sector firms with insights on issues involving their participation in the public procurement market while offering policy makers information on their country’s public procurement regulatory system and related business practices. The data also benefit the academic and research community by offering better tools and data on procurement systems and facilitating cross-country analysis.

Benchmarking Public Procurement builds on the World Bank Group Doing Business methodology, a flagship report with a proven track record of measuring economies’ business climates and leveraging regulatory reforms. Benchmarking Public Procurement 2017 draws on readily comparable data across two thematic pillars: the procurement process - from the assessment of needs to the implementation of the procurement contract -  and the public procurement complaint review mechanisms.

Also, the Benchmarking Public Procurement methodology was replicated and expanded to cover the procurement of public-private partnerships (PPP). A stand-alone report assessing governments’ capability to prepare, procure, and manage PPPs in 82 economies was produced, and the complete dataset can be found this website.

Benchmarking Public Procurement 2017 builds on the lessons learned from two previous data collection, and their consecutive analysis and reports:

  • Benchmarking Public Procurement 2015, which covered 10 economies (Afghanistan, Chile, Ghana, Jordan, Mexico, Sweden, Thailand, Turkey, Uganda, and the United States). Data were also collected later on the Russian Federation.

  • Benchmarking Public Procurement 2016, which expanded the geographical coverage to include 77 economies in seven regions.